Is Injury Hacking the Future of Sports Coaching?

Is Injury Hacking the Future of Sports Coaching?

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Is Injury Hacking the Future of Sports Coaching? Hey, I’m Sarah from mostmotion® and I’m here with another video for every sports and fitness coach who wants to help their clients and participants to avoid injuries but don’t want to specialise in injuries themselves or become therapists.

So what is injury hacking? Basically, it’s breaking injuries down into their simplest form, so that we can see the opportunities for more people to help, even if they don’t know the first thing about injuries themselves.

So how does this work? Well, if we imagine an operating theatre, for example, inside of the operating theatre, you’ve got a surgeon who’s doing the actual surgery itself, but they are not on their own inside of that theatre, there’s an anaesthetist, there’s scrub technicians and nurses who are doing other jobs to compliment the surgeon, even if it’s bringing the patient to the operating theatre itself, tying gowns for people once they’ve scrubbed up. So they’re not touching things that aren’t necessarily sterile. They, you know, they pass the scalpel so that the surgeon doesn’t have to keep looking around for the instruments that they need and things like that. And obviously, I apologise if I get those names and roles wrong. But the point is, the surgeon isn’t on their own, and that every single person inside of the operating theatre is working on their own individual little roll, but it complements everything that everybody else is doing. Okay, so that gives the best outcome for the patient.

So what does this have to do with injuries? Well, at the moment, when it comes to injuries, it’s almost like we’re leaving everything to the surgeon and the odd assistant. And now what I mean by that is, if coaches aren’t fully qualified in injury specialisms and maybe even therapy itself, then essentially, we’re just not allowed in the room. You know, we’re not allowed in the operating theatre, we’re not allowed into that conversation about injuries, which is ridiculous.

I mean, does this the scrub technician have to know anything about brain surgery to be able to tie somebody down or surpass a scalpel? Which those things are super important, but they’re very, very small jobs. Do they have to know anything about surgery? Absolutely not, you know? Could they learn that stuff? If they wanted to do brain surgery? Of course they could.

But the surgeon benefits from those small jobs, even though the scrub technician doesn’t know anything about surgery. And that means the patient does as well. And it’s the same when it comes to injuries. Okay.

Not all coaches need or want to know anything about treating injuries, but we can all do the small jobs that help out. So for example, we can all observe behaviour and movement.

One of the most overlooked signs or elements of injury prevention is the clues that a patient or clients or participants, behaviour and movement give out before the injury becomes painful. I’ll say that, again. There are clues that your clients behaviour, and body language and movement give out before the injury becomes painful, which are huge indicators that a problem is coming. And we can all observe those things, regardless of what coaching knowledge we have. So if we can look for those clues, we can identify them quicker, we can tell our clients about them quicker, it means they can go and have treatment quicker, it’s cheaper. It’s faster, all that stuff. And everybody’s playing their individual role in that process.

So does the coach need to know anything about injuries themselves when they’re looking for these restrictions in movement, when they’re looking for the associated behaviours with that? Absolutely not.

But does the client benefit from these powers of observation? Absolutely. So this is just the first step. Once you have identified that non painful joint restrictions create behaviour change, and movement changes, then could you learn how to start getting those non painful things moving again? Absolutely. Could you then learn what the underpinning factors are in a lot of injuries that are non painful when it comes to joint restrictions? Absolutely. Could you then learn the language and some of the roles and the responsibilities that other professionals then use and understand how your coaching might fit alongside that. Absolutely.

And these are all steps that I’ve outlined in my book, “The Coaches Guide to Long Term Injury Prevention Success“, you can get the book absolutely free. Just comment below the word book, and I’ll send you the link directly to you. There’s no catch it’s absolutely free. Just comment below the word book, I will send you the outline, the five steps, I’ll show you exactly all the strategies and everything, the tips, there’s a checklist in there and all sorts of stuff in the book that you can use to get involved in the conversation about injuries and start contributing to injury prevention.

And if we don’t start including coaches who don’t know anything about injuries in the conversation, then we will going to end up and continue this downward spiral into younger and younger people experiencing these injuries is going to stop people’s life chances is going to stop these upcoming stars becoming stars themselves, because injuries will just keep getting in the way.

So if we want to stop these injuries being inevitable, then yes, injury hacking is the future of sports coaching. And we can know how to do that through the book itself. So make sure you comment book below if you want access to that free book.

And of course, if you’re intrigued and interested or even excited by the idea of injury hacking come and join our brand new Facebook group, you can join us at injuryhackers.com, we’re going to look at tips and tricks and behind the scenes, goodies and all that kind of stuff. And of course hacks for injuries as well. So make sure you come and join us. Thanks for watching. I’m Sarah from mostmotion® and I’ll see you again next timeTranscribed by https://otter.ai-2 -small jobs. Do they have to know anything about surgery? Absolutely not, you know? Could they learn that stuff? If they wanted to do brain surgery? Of course they could. But the surgeon benefits from those small jobs, even though the scrub technician doesn’t know anything about surgery. And that means the patient does as well. And it’s the same when it comes to injuries. Okay. Not all coaches need or want to know anything about treating injuries, but we can all do the small jobs that help out. So for example, we can all observe behaviour and movement. One of the most overlooked signs or elements of injury prevention is the clues that a patient or clients or participants, behaviour and movement give out before the injury becomes painful. I’ll say that, again. There are clues that your clients behaviour, and body language and movement give out before the injury becomes painful, which are huge indicators that a problem is coming. And we can all observe those things, regardless of what coaching knowledge we have. So if we can look for those clues, we can identify them quicker, we can tell our clients about them quicker, it means they can go and have treatment quicker, it’s cheaper. It’s faster, all that stuff. And everybody’s playing their individual role in that process. So does the coach need to know anything about injuries themselves when they’re looking for these restrictions in movement, when they’re looking for the associated behaviours with that? Absolutely not.But does the client benefit from these powers of observation? Absolutely. So this is just the first step. Once you have identified that non painful joint restrictions create behaviour change, and movement changes, then could you learn how to start getting those non painful things moving again? Absolutely. Could you then learn what the underpinning factors are in a lot of injuries that are non painful when it comes to joint restrictions? Absolutely. Could you then learn the language and some of the roles andthe responsibilities that other professionals then use and understand how your coaching might fit alongside that. Absolutely. And these are all steps that I’ve outlined in my book, “The Coaches Guide to Long Term Injury Prevention Success”, you can get the book absolutely free. Just comment below the word book, and I’ll send you the link directly to you. There’s no catch it’s absolutely free. Just comment below the word book, I will send you the outline, the five steps, I’ll show you exactly all the strategies and everything, the tips, there’s a checklist in there and all sorts of stuff in the book that you can use to get involved in the conversation about injuries and start contributing to injury prevention. And if we don’t start including coaches who don’t know anything about injuries in the conversation, then we will going to end up and continue this downward spiral into younger and younger people experiencing these injuries is going to stop people’s life chances is going to stop these upcoming stars becoming stars themselves, because injuries will just keep getting in the way. So if we want to stop these injuries being inevitable, then yes, injury hacking is the future of sports coaching. And we can know how to do that through the book itself. So makesure you comment book below if you want access to that free book.And of course, if you’re intrigued and interested or even excited by the idea of injury hacking come and join our brand new Facebook group, you can join us at injuryhackers.com, we’re going to look at tips and tricks and behind the scenes, goodies and all that kind of stuff. And of course hacks for injuries as



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